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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - FP7 Project management aspects

Answer: 

It is advisable to find a partner that has more experience in managing the project and making sure that the joint application succeeds. The management and training activities are funded up to 100%, but not the project preparation. You can use the FFH 2.0 matchmaking section to find partners that offer project management skills for Horizon 2020

Answer: 

It takes on average one year including the evaluation phase, the negotiation phase and the signature of contracts. But these delays are now constantly reduced by a faster treatment of administrative procedures by the EC services.

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Demonstration activities are closer to the product than research activities. Demonstration activities include e.g. prototype development, surveys, and up-scaling activities.

Answer: 

<p><strong>For clarity: dissemination includes everything from attending conferences to talk about results of the project to personnel costs for writing scientific papers about the project results to establishing and maintaining the project website. Is this correct?</strong></p>
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Dissemination is everything you do to get the results / outcome of the project to the right target group(s)

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The advice is to include an AB already in the project governance structure of the project at the first stage. It may help to convince the evaluators.

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I would recommend integrating a Gantt or Pert Chart in first stage proposals only when you stick to the page limit. The Guide for Applicants does not foresee to have a Gantt or Pert Chart at stage one.

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Our centre is a national consortium composed of research groups from different hospitals, universities, etc. If a research group applies for funds as part of the consortium, how do we reflect their belonging to other institutions?
 
Here it depends if your centre is a legal entity or not. If it is, then the Centre can apply for funding. If not, the hospitals, universities etc. should apply as partners.
If the centre is a partner and people doing the research work are not “directly hired” by the centre but have a working contract at a hospital, university which is member of the centre, then the costs of the personnel might only be eligible if the hospital, university is as a “third party linked to the beneficiary” with special clause 10 in the Grant Agreement working in the project.

Answer: 

When a hospital is a service provider who will not need to get access to other parties of the project it is a typical sub-contractor. On the other hand if a clinic is affiliated to one of the partners and likes to get access to the results and perhaps IPR then it should be involved as a third party linked to the beneficiary with special clause 10 (means: the partner is responsible for the reporting, the budget and the scientific quality and is steering the hospital as an affiliated partner/(third party).

Answer: 

After every reporting period there has to be a periodic report for the period (as well as a financial report Form C) – there also has to be a periodic report for the last period. After the last period a final report has to be handed in additionally. Reporting is done on-line via the Participant Portal.

Answer: 

It depends on the legal structure of the hospital. If the pharmacy is within the legal structure (is the same legal entity as the hospital), it is a part of the partner of the consortium and therefore “the partner”. If the pharmacy is a legal entity on its own, then it can be regarded as a third party linked to the beneficiary with special clause 10, when there is a link between the hospital and the pharmacy (holding structure, mother, daughter etc.). For the work in the project an agreement between the pharmacy and the hospital has to be set up.